Topic

Topic: Mitigating Chemical Runoff Into Water Bodies From Agricultural Farming
Mateo-Sagasta, J., Zadeh, S. M., Turral H., Burke J. (2017). Water pollution from agriculture: a global review: Executive summary. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and Colombo: International Water Management Institute on behalf of the Water Land and Ecosystems research program.
Mateo-Sagasta, Zadeh, Turral and Burke (2017) discuss the role of agriculture in water pollution in surrounding farming environments. They explained the harmful effect of known farming-pollutants such as fertilizers, pesticides, sedimentation, salts, organic matter, pathogens and hormones affect the waterways and stated solutions to combat this problem. Models were noted that mimic currents and water circulation to stimulate the effect of water-pollution without mitigation. This helps to educate the general population, especially farmers, so that water-pollution will atrophy. The article is a critical analysis and interpretation of data from global case studies and surveys conveyed in articles published by the same researchers, all of which will be included in my team’s research paper.
Although the article is a secondary scholarly source, it is deemed valid and reliable to use the presented information. The article was published by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations in Rome and the research was done by the International Water Management Institute on behalf of the Water Land and Ecosystems research program. These organizations are epitome for explicit academic research on safeguarding the environment and food production. All authors have doctoral or masters within the field and have numerous years of research experience to produce information accurately.
The article isn’t jargon-laden however phrases like “misuse of agrochemicals”, “eutrophication”, “carbon sequestration” and “remediation of contaminated waters”, suggests as reading material for someone who has exceeded secondary education-level or personnel within the field of agriculture. Throughout the article, Mateo-Sagasta et al (2017) emphasized that “Population growth and changes in consumption patterns, including new dietary preferences require the production of more and diverse food. This is driving agricultural expansion and intensification and bringing new environmental externalities, including impacts on water quality (p. 5),” informs us of the serious need for mitigation to safeguard the environment and human health.