Many people have had the experience of looking at a beautiful curved walkway or curvature in a piece of architecture and responded to that on a visceral level

Many people have had the experience of looking at a beautiful curved walkway or curvature in a piece of architecture and responded to that on a visceral level, as opposed to something that’s very sharp and angular, that we might not feel as inclined to approach as we would something with curves, those kinds of responses are more intuitive and may even be written in our genes but some responses to our surroundings are primarily influenced by our experience, knowledge, and culture.
The surrounding – compromising elements of nature, artifacts and people busy with various forms of activity – is part of the landscape we have to do within our expectations. John B. Jackson mentions that landscape ‘is never simply a natural space, a feature of the natural environment. By which feature in compromises the place where we establish our own human organization of space and time’. Since humans depend on landscapes for resources, alter landscapes for myriad reasons we could definitely say that it is a human-landscape interaction, also often it is described as nature-society or human-environment interactions. In an understanding that people act on and even produce the natural world, and in doing so cultivate a new relationship with the environment.