5158740-552450 CONTEXTUALIZATION AND LOCALIZATION IN MATHEMATICS TEACHING

5158740-552450
CONTEXTUALIZATION AND LOCALIZATION IN MATHEMATICS TEACHING:
EXPERIENCES OF TEACHERS IN BOGO
A Dissertation
Presented to
The Faculty of the Graduate School of Education
University of the Visayas
Cebu City
In Fulfillment
of the Requirements for the degree of
DOCTOR IN EDUCATION (Ed. D)
Major in Educational Leadership and Administration
KRISTHYL SUSVILLA ESTAY
August 2018
APPROVAL SHEET
The dissertation with the title “CONTEXTUALIZATION AND LOCALIZATION IN MATHEMATICS TEACHING: EXPERCIENCES OF TEACHERS IN BOGO” prepared and submitted by KRISTHYL SUSVILLA ESTAY in fulfillment of the requirements for the degree DOCTOR OF EDUCATION (Ed. D) major in EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT has been examined and approved.

ZOSIMA A. PAÑARES, Ph. D
Consultant, Graduate School of Education
University of the Visayas
Adviser
THE DISSERTATION COMMITTEE
DR. EDSEL P. INOCIAN
Consultant, Graduate School of Education
University of the Visayas
Chairman
DR. EMMA A. YAUN DR. MARIVIC V. MANUBAG
Consultant, Graduate School of Education Consultant. Graduate School of Education
University of the VisayasUniversity of the Visayas
MemberMember NERISSA S. LOPEZ, Ed. D
Dean, Graduate School of Education

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PANEL OF EVALUATORS
Approved by the Committee on Oral Examination with a grade of PASSED.

DR. EDSEL P. INOCIAN
Consultant, Graduate School of Education
University of the Visayas
Chairman
DR. EMMA A. YAUN DR. MARIVIC V. MANUBAG
Consultant, Graduate School of Education Consultant. Graduate School of Education
University of the VisayasUniversity of the Visayas
MemberMemberAccepted and approved in fulfillment of the requirements for the degree DOCTOR OF EDUCATION (Ed. D) MAJOR IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT.

Comprehensive Examination: PASSED
Date of Oral Examination:August 04, 2018
Date of Submission:
NERISSA S. LOPEZ, Ed. D
Dean, Graduate School of Education
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
My foremost gratitude to the Almighty God, the giver of life, full of blessings and grace and the source of all wisdom. And for all the bounty, enlighten and guidance He provided in making everything possible in the completion of this research work.

Sense of gratitude is also extended to many people who showed genuine support and I am very much thankful to them all. First, I would like to acknowledge all the teachers who charitably shared time and helped me with my research.
To my genius Schools Division Superintendent before in the Division of City of Bogo, Dr. Nimfa D. Bongo, CESO V, for her trust and encouragement to conduct this research.
To my supportive School Principal II, Mrs, Elizabeth Q. Bilaos, in City of Bogo Science and Arts Academy, for allowing me to pursue my studies.
To my witty and humble Research Adviser, Dr. Zosima Pañares, for sharing her expertise and valuable suggestions for the refinement of my study.

To my dissertation committee, the Chairman, Dr. Edsel Inocian, the member and the Dean of the Graduate School of Education in this institution, Dr. Nerissa S. Lopez, the two members Dr. Emma Yaun and Dr. Marivic Manubag, my special thanks for your constructive criticism and brilliant suggestions.

To My loving parents, Retired SPO1 Baltazar A. Susvilla and Dr. Bernadette A. Susvilla, a big thank you for everything because without them, I won’t be here.

To my brilliant siblings, Apple Maye A. Susvilla, Lyka Maureene A. Susvilla, Baejay A. Susvilla, Baltazar A. Susvilla Jr., and Katriz Mae A. Susvilla, for patiently taking care of my daughter, the time and day when I am not around.
Thank you to my friends, CBSAA Family, the different public schools both elementary and secondary in the Division of City of Bogo and colleagues who endowed encouragement. Thanks also UV Family for reaching my mother’s dream come true.
Finally, special thanks to my hubby, Jovanie A. Estay and blessed daughter, Kheanne S. Estay, thank you for the unconditional love and support. I love you both.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
TITLE PAGE …………………………………………………….………………. iAPPROVAL SHEET ………………………………………….…………………ii
PANEL OF ORAL EXAMINERS …………………………..……………………iii
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS …………………………………………..…………..iv
TABLE OF CONTENTS………………………………………………………….v
ABSTRACT ……………………………………………………………………… vii
LIST OF TABLES……………………………………………………….……….x
LIST OF FIGURES …………………………………………………………….…..xi
Chapter
I – THE PROBLEM …………………………………………..……………….1
Introduction ………………………………………………………………..1
Atheoretical Perspective …………………………………………………… 4
Philosophical Stance ……………………………………………………6
Domain of Inquiry …………………………………………………………8
Significance of the Study …………………………………………………9
II – RESEARCH METHODOLOGY AND PROCEDURES …………………10
Research Design ………….………………………………………….10
In -depth review of literature ………………………….………10
Type of Choice …………………………….………….……….12
Creating Grounded Theory …………………………….………..14
Continuing objectivity and sensitivity viewpoints ………………15
Research Environment …………………………………….……………16
Research Participants ………………………………………………………17
Research Instrument …………………………………………………….19
Data Gathering Procedures ………………………………………………20
Preliminaries ……………………………………….………….20
The Interview Process…………………………….………………21
Documentation ………………………………….………………..22
Data Analysis ……………………………………………………………23
Prelude procedures of data analysis …………….………………..23
Memo Writing ……………………………………………………24
Clustering ………………………………………………………..25
Constant comparative analysis ………………………………….25
Open Coding ……………………………………………………26
Focused Coding …………………………………………………27
Axial Coding ……………………………………………………27
Selective Coding ……………………………………………….28
Ethical Considerations……………………………………………………28
Risk and Benefit Assessment ………………………..………….29
Content, Comprehension and Documentation of
Informed Consent………………..…………….………29
Debriefing, Communication and Referrals ……………….…….32
Conflict of Interest ……………………………………….……..33
Safe Treatment ………………………………………….………33
Rigor of the Study ……………………………………………………… 33
III – THE SWEET SIXTEEN ……………………………………..………35
Initial Coding ………………………………………………………..35
Attributes of the Participants ………………………………..35
The Interview processes …………………………………………….36
Significant concepts from open coding ……………………………..38
Memo Writing ………………………………………………39
Categories to Themes ………………………………………………40
Category 1 ………………………………………………….40
Category 2 ………………………………………………….41
Category 3 ………………………………………………….42
Category 4 ………………………………………………….44
Category 5 …………………………………………………45
Identification of Emerging Categories to Tentative Theories …….47
Theme 1 – Swimming in muddy water ……………………………48
Theme 2 – It’s not enough; be prepared…………..………………49
Theme 3 – To make is better than to receive ………………………51
Theme 4 – A friend need is a friend indeed ……………………….53
Theme 5 – An extra mile; an extra smile …………………………54
IV – THEORY GENERATION……………..………………………..……….56
Tentative Theories ………………………………………………………….56
Tentative Theory 1………………………………………………….56
Tentative Theory 2 …………………………..……………………58
Tentative Theory 3 ………………………………………………59
Generated Theory ………………………………………………………..61
Contextualization and Localization ………………………………..63
Teacher’s Instructional Competences …………………………..63
Create relevant materials ……………………………….……….64
Meaningful learning experiences …………………………………..64
Testable Hypotheses for validation ……………………………………….65
V – EVALUATION OF THE GROUNDED THEORY,
CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS…………………………….66
Evaluation of the Grounded Theory …………………………………….66
Conclusions ……………………………………………………………..67
Implications for Teaching Learning Process ……………………………69
CONCEPTUAL MODEL ………………………….………………………..62
REFERENCES ………………………………………..…………………………71
APPENDICES……………………………………….…………………………69
Appendix A – Letter to the Dean …………………..………………………78
Appendix B – Letter to the Superintendent …………………………79
Appendix C – Information Letter …………………………………… 80
Appendix D – Consent Form ………………………………………..83
Appendix E – Demographic Questionnaire …………………………84
Appendix F – Statement of Agreement ……………………………..85
Appendix G – Map of Cebu Province ………………………………86
Appendix H – Interview Guide ……………………………………..87
Appendix I – Demographic Information of Study Participants …… 88
Appendix J – The Transcriptions ……………………………………89
Appendix K – Notice to Proceed and Agreement …………………..Appendix L – Plagiarism Check …………………………………….

Appendix M – Censorship Certificate ………………………………
CURRICULUM VITAE …………………………………………………… 99
LIST OF TABLES
Table 1 – List of Initial Indicators and Concepts from Interviews……………… 38
Table 2 – Analysis of Category 1 ………………………………………………41
Table 3 – Analysis of Category 2 ………………………………………………42
Table 4 – Analysis of Category 3 ………………………………………………44
Table 5 – Analysis of Category 4 ………………………………………………45
Table 6 – Analysis of Category 5 ………………………………………………47
LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1 – Relationship between abduction, induction and
deduction in grounded theory ……………………………………… 41
Figure 2 – Educational Translation Theory …………….…….…………………… 62
CONTEXTUALIZATION AND LOCALIZATION IN MATHEMATICS TEACHING:
EXPERIENCES OF TEACHERS IN BOGO
Kristhyl Susvilla EstayBogo Central School, Bogo Cebu
Contact Number: 0997 9769738
Abstract. The most powerful tool utilized by the school to achieve the educational objectives in the country is curriculum. One of the salient features in the K to 12 Curriculum is making the curriculum relevant to learners. Hence, the teachers are fully aware on these standards and principles; but few are implementing it. Many claimed that they are implementing it, but some of them have the difficulty in implementing it effectively. To implement these principles of the lessons effectively, this study was to explore the experiences of Mathematics teachers on Contextualization and Localization of lessons in Mathematics in the Division of City of Bogo, Cebu Province towards developing a substantive theory.
The researcher utilized a constructivist approach by Charmaz in grounded theory. A sample of sixteen participants was selected allowing the development of a substantive theory. This substantive theory impacts with the students, teachers, school heads, and DepEd teaching personnel. This is realized through exploring and analyzing which the teachers experience contextualization and localization of lessons in Mathematics through the perceptions of the teacher’s instructional competence, the community adaptation and the student’s engagement.
With these perceptions, teachers can present the lesson in a more meaningful learning experiences and relevant context based on the learner’s previous experiences and real-life situations. Both of which adhere in making the lesson flexible, fit, creative, relevant, meaningful, and adoptive to students’ level of understanding and instructional needs.
Keywords: curriculum, contextualization, localization, grounded theory,
Constructivist approach, experiences, Mathematics

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